Hudson NH Greater New Hampshire Real Estate

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Along the Merrimack River, east of Nashua on the Massachusetts border, lies the town of Hudson, NH.

The town of Hudson NH was originally part of Dunstable, Massachusetts. Sixty years later, in 1733, Hudson was separated from the rest of the tract and renamed Nottingham.

Nottingham’s name changed again in 1741, when the disputed border lands, of which Hudson was a part, were granted to New Hampshire. Two more name changes were to follow. In 1746, Nottingham changed its name to Nottingham West. Then in 1830, amid concerns of the name’s similarity to the original Nottingham, Nottingham West became Hudson, New Hampshire.

Originally a small farming community; Hudson today features miles of residential neighborhoods alongside commercial and industrial development, with some small retail plazas as well as high-tech companies.

The Merrimack River has always been an important thoroughfare to the town. The Taylor’s Falls Bridge, which connects Hudson with Nashua, opened as a toll bridge in 1826. A second bridge, made of iron, replaced the old covered bridge in 1881, but it had not been built to support the additional weight of trolleys.

Electric trolleys, which were introduced in 1909, ran from Nashua to the seacoast and needed an efficient point for crossing over the Merrimack River. In 1910, a third structure, made of concrete, was built. ironically, it outlasted the trolleys that it was designed to accommodate. Finally, in 1974, a fourth bridge was placed at Taylor’s Falls, and today oldtimers consider that bridge a reminder of the town’s heritage.

Farming and logging were the main pursuits before the turn of the century.

Many of Hudson’s historic buildings are the legacy of Dr. Alfred Hills. A New York City surgeon who summered in Hudson, Dr. Hills built the Hills Memorial Library and the Alvirne Chapel in 1909 in memory of his wife. He also left his home, Alvirne, to the Hudson Historical Society and bequeathed funds and 180 acres of land to build a high school. Today, Alvirne High School serves both Hudson and neighboring Litchfield and is well known across the region for its vocational center and accompanying agricultural and horticultural programs.

Now home to 20,000 residents, Hudson’s retail development has also grown over the past several years, and the town boasts a number of businesses, including Sanders, a Lockheed Martin Company, Teledyne, Sam’s Club, Wal-Mart, and Telegraph Publishing.

There is a town beach on Robinson Pond, as well as a number of parks and playgrounds, including Ottarnic Pond, Merrifield Park, Merrill Park, and the Musquash Conservation Area, which offers walking trails. Hudson also features tennis courts and two golf courses, along with a miniature golf course and a driving range.

In May of 2010, the former Benson’s Wild Animal Farmi reopened as a town park for recreational use, and it’s free. The park has been rehabilitated for the trails and remaining buildings such as the Gorilla House & the Elephant House. During fall, it is a great time to bring your pets and family, or go for a jog, bike ride, or a brisk walk. The park contains miles of trails, as well as many beautiful lakes and ponds as well as a large dog park.

Hudson NH Median Sales Prices

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